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The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue by Matthew L. Jones

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Published by University Of Chicago Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ethics & moral philosophy,
  • Philosophy of science,
  • History,
  • Science / History,
  • Science,
  • 17th century,
  • Mathematics,
  • Moral and ethical aspects,
  • Philosophy,
  • Science/Mathematics

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages336
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10192156M
ISBN 100226409546
ISBN 109780226409542

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Amid the unrest, dislocation, and uncertainty of seventeenth-century Europe, readers seeking consolation and assurance turned to philosophical and scientific books that offered ways of conquering fears and training the mind—guidance for living a good Good Life in the Scientific Revolution presents a triptych showing how three key early modern scientists, René Descartes, Blaise. The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue - Ebook written by Matthew L. Jones. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of : Matthew L. Jones. Scientific Revolution, drastic change in scientific thought that took place during the 16th and 17th centuries.A new view of nature emerged during the Scientific Revolution, replacing the Greek view that had dominated science for almost 2, years. Science became an autonomous discipline, distinct from both philosophy and technology, and it came to be regarded as having utilitarian goals. The Scientific Revolution was a series of events that marked the emergence of modern science during the early modern period, when developments in mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology (including human anatomy) and chemistry transformed the views of society about nature. The Scientific Revolution took place in Europe towards the end of the Renaissance period and continued through .

Amid the unrest, dislocation, and uncertainty of seventeenth-century Europe, readers seeking consolation and assurance turned to philosophical and scientific books that offered ways of conquering fears and training the mind--guidance for living a good life. "The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution" presents a triptych showing how three key. (shelved 1 time as scientific-revolution) avg rating — 2, ratings — published Want to Read saving. The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and The. [REVIEW] Charlie Huenemann - - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2) [author unknown] - unknown.   Free Online Library: The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue.(Book review) by "Renaissance Quarterly"; Humanities, general Literature, writing, book reviews Books Book reviews.

The lecture. The talk was delivered 7 May in the Senate House, Cambridge, and subsequently published as The Two Cultures and the Scientific lecture and book expanded upon an article by Snow published in the New Statesman of 6 October , also entitled "The Two Cultures". Published in book form, Snow's lecture was widely read and discussed on both sides of the Atlantic. While the dates of the scientific revolution are disputed, the publication in of Nicolaus Copernicus’s De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) is often cited as marking the beginning of the scientific revolution. The book proposed a heliocentric system contrary to the widely accepted geocentric. Get this from a library! The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue. [Matthew L Jones] -- Amid the unrest, dislocation, and uncertainty of seventeenth-century Europe, readers seeking consolation and assurance turned to philosophical and scientific books that offered ways of conquering. Cavendish’s main scientific work was Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy (), written in the vernacular, rather than the Latin that was typical of scientific books until well into the nineteenth century, which itself reflects the scientific revolution’s origin in the Greek and Latin classics.